Prep and Updates of Replica FU-539 Paint Scheme 2020-2021

 
 
 

May 9, 2021

May 9, 2021

May 9, 2021

May 7, 2021

May 7, 2021

May 7, 2021

May 7, 2021

May 7, 2021

May 7, 2021

May 1, 2021

May 1, 2021

May 1, 2021

April 30, 2021

Thanks to Jerry Wilkins for the photos!

April 26, 2021

Thanks to Jerry Wilkins for the photos!

April 21, 2021

Thanks to Jane Hinton for the photo!

April 17, 2021

April 9, 2021

Thanks to Jane Hinton for the updated photos!

April 3, 2021

April 3, 2021

March 13, 2021

 

February 16, 2021

 

February 7, 2021

 

January 31, 2021

January 31, 2021

January 30, 2021

January 30, 2021

Notes from Brian Finnegan on update:

With the end of the “Stay At Home” orders for Southern California, and with San Bernardino County in the Widespread (Purple) tier, Planes of Fame Air Museum will open as an outdoor Museum beginning on Saturday, January 30, 2021. The Museum will also be open on Sunday, January 31, 2021 and thereafter, will be open all Thursdays thru Sundays. Hours of operation are 10:00am until 4:00pm.

Guests will be able to visit most of the outdoor areas of the 10 acre facility and will be able to view the majority of aircraft from the open large hangar doors. Museum Guides wearing masks and maintaining social distance will tell the stories related to the aircraft.

On Saturdays and Sundays, the Museum’s Boeing B-17 “Flying Fortress” will be open to visitors to safely enter and learn about the men and women who designed, built, and flew these massive bombers during World War II.

Discount pricing remains in effect ($8.00 per adult, $4.00 for children 5-11, and 4 and under are Free. The Museum’s Gift Shop is open.

Guests are asked to wear a face covering at all times while at the Museum and to maintain safe social distancing from those outside their immediate family. Anyone not feeling well or anyone who has been exposed to someone who has tested positive for Covid-19 is asked not to visit at this time.

November 25, 2020

The painting of FU-539 is currently on hold.

Notes from Brian Finnegan on update:

"With the recent surge in Covid-19 infections throughout the Southern California region and in the interest of public health and safety, the Planes of Fame Air Museum will remain closed until further notice.

We encourage everyone to minimize their travel to only essential needs and to continue to maintain social distance, wear a face covering when in contact with others, and wash hands thoroughly and frequently.

Watch our website and social media platforms for updates on the reopening of our Outdoor Experience."

September 11, 2020

Notes from Jane Hinton on update:

"The F-86 is at the paint shop now for it's final base coat of silver. Unfortunately, due to the extreme heat, the painting was delayed several weeks. They can't paint when it's too hot because the paint will dry too quickly and not come out nice and smooth. Now, the issue is that there is so much ash in the air from the wildfires that it would stick into the finish."

"We have made progress on the memorial though! We've finished giving the fence a fresh coat of paint a few weeks ago (a different kind of paint!), installing new handrails along the ramp for accessibility (we have many disabled and older veterans visit our museum and we want to make sure they can access the site), and we've painted and installed the 13 ft base pole for the F-86." - Jane

August 24, 2020

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August 14, 2020

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August 4, 2020

A Man and His Pole


Jerry Wilkins is a man beaming with pride.

“My pole is sure impressive,” he boasts.

It’s not a sentence one man usually hears from another so I bite my lower lip.

“Wanna see it?” he inquires. Respectfully, I decline.

“No, no, you’ll love it. Let’s sneak out back and let me show you my pole.”

Even on the walk through the Museum’s backyard he continues, “It’s long and sleek and built to last.”

I’m becoming very uncomfortable.

As we turn a corner, he wheels in front of me. “Ready to see it? Here you go.” He steps aside to show me his pole.

Jerry’s right, it is impressive.

At thirteen feet in length and several tons in weight, it is all he said it would be. It’s destined for the Museum’s new Korean War Memorial, where it will support a North American F-86 Sabre jet.

“Yep, made of one-inch thick, high grade steel,” Jerry said as he slapped a palm against the side of the pole. “Stainless steel welds too, so they won’t rust. And check out the end; see how it’s angled to hold the airplane?”

The end of the pole Jerry referred to is angled and pre-drilled with holes to accept the F-86, one of two aircraft that serve as focal points for this memorial to “America’s Forgotten War.” The other aircraft, a Russian-built MiG-15, already sits in its concrete cradle at the memorial site.

“You know,” Jerry said as he took a seat on the pole. “This pole is more than a pole, it’s a symbol. Oh sure, it’s built to suspend a Korean War airplane overhead, but it’s also symbolic of how we as a nation need to support our military.

“We sent thousands of soldiers, sailors, airmen and marines over to Korea. They went because their nation asked them to. They didn’t complain. They fought; many died, and three years later, those who survived simply packed up and went back home and got on with their lives.

“Sadly, their nation forgot all about their war. Forgot what they sacrificed, how they served. We can’t do that. We owe them more than that. That’s why this memorial is so important.”

Jerry’s points are well taken. In the 37 months of the Korean conflict, America deployed nearly 1.8 million troops to the Korean peninsula. Over 36,000 Americans died, another 92,000 were wounded, and nearly 5,000 are still missing in action. The war ended in stalemate, and disagreements between North and South Korea still fester. Sadly, ask most Americans about the Korean War and they’ll shake their heads. It didn’t end with victory parades. It’s not taught in the schools. It’s largely forgotten.

“I’m so proud of Planes of Fame with this project,” Jerry said. “Our Korean War Memorial will be a living tribute to all the men and women who served in this conflict, and especially those who died.”

The passion in Jerry’s voice speaks of his commitment to the project. There’s still much to do in the coming weeks to pull the memorial together, but clearly, he is the man who can do it.

I almost feel ashamed at my earlier misreading of his boastful comments about his pole.

Almost.

But as Jerry points over to the F-86 Sabre jet that will be a part of the memorial, he remarks, “Now I just need to figure out how to mount her on my pole.”

Once again, I bite my lower lip.



Jerry's Pole.


Our thanks to Gary Johnson and all the gang at Ace Clearwater Enterprises for their generous sponsorship of the F-86 pole. You guys rock!

Source: Email sent out from the Planes of Fame Air Museum August 4, 2020

August 1, 2020

Notes from Craig Bryant: "I was at the museum on Saturday and got another picture of the F-86. When I looked at the new paint job up close I guess I hadn't noticed before how much of a metal flake finish it has. It really sparkles in the sun. I don't know if you can zoom in on this but I think it's clear enough that you may be able to see it. I spoke with a couple people on the progress of the project. The outer fence around the display is done being painted. I was told that Corey, one of the young guys who works out there, is going to head up doing the detail painting on the plane. I've seen his work and he is very good. It's just a matter of him getting the time to do it. Soon I hope. Arrangements have already been made to use the same crane company to lift it up and put it in place once the painting is done. I know that it seems slow, but things are moving forward."

Thank you Craig for that update!

 

July 19, 2020

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July 18, 2020

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July 18, 2020

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July 17, 2020

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July 12, 2020

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July 11, 2020

Adam helped with the fence restoration below. He cited that they packed up after lunch there since it had gone over 100 degrees! They used scotch brite to sand off the calcium from the sprinklers and repainted them with Rustoleum.

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July 11, 2020

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July 5, 2020

During this time, Craig noted that the F-86 has moved from its area near the hanger and has been pushed back to the wash area in preparation of being painted. In the meantime, he took a beautiful shot of the MiG fighter on the newly poured concrete pedestals. This MiG will also be a part of the new Korean War memorial.

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June 21, 2020

 

 

 

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June 20, 2020

 

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June 11, 2020

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April 9, 2020

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Restoration Pre-2020

 
 
 

Photo by Mark Richardson from the facebook page: North American F-86A/E/F/H Sabre, F-86D/K/L Sabre Dog

Photo taken April 1, 2014

Photo by Gary T. Takeuchi (2017)

Photo by Gary T. Takeuchi (2017)

Photo by Gary T. Takeuchi (2017)

Photo by Gary T. Takeuchi (2018)

Photo by Gary T. Takeuchi (2018)

Photo by Gary T. Takeuchi (2018)

 

Planes of Fame website

 

 
 

 

F-86A at the Planes of Fame museum by SharkyJ17